Category Archives: Movement for Black Lives

Beautiful, Rare Video Footage From the 1920s of All Black Towns

Photo From Video Footage Below

These towns and their self-reliant middle class and affluent residents are documented by the home movies of Reverend S. S. Jones, an itinerant minister and businessman.

Stunning and inspiring! Most of us know about Black Wall Wall Street; but there were many towns across America where Black people thrived. Whites didn’t like that, of course, and as we saw with Black Wall Street, these jealous sick freaks stole by demolishing, because they couldn’t handle not being best. It’s hard to be best when they always had others enslaved doing the work for them. But this is a happy post so!

the video footage by clicking here. I can’t embed it sadly. Article associated posted below.

Part three of a four-part series from the film archive of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture

By the 1920s, Oklahoma was home to some 50 African-American towns, in addition to a large and prosperous black community living in the city of Tulsa. These towns and their self-reliant middle class and affluent residents are documented by the home movies of Reverend S. S. Jones, an itinerant minister and businessman. Known and respected by the citizens of the towns whose lives he captured on film, Rev. Jones’s work offers revealing glimpses of these communities as a haven for African Americans who very often faced discrimination elsewhere in America.

The subjects are everyday life: a family on the front porch of their bungalow, shop workers at a storefront, farmers plowing their fields, children playing on seesaws in a schoolyard. Much of the material documents the economic life of the towns, from business districts filled with prosperous merchants to the homes of successful professionals, with an abundant countryside beyond.

As Rhea Combs, curator of film and photography for the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, points out in her commentary, here we even find a married couple who were oil barons, proof of the extraordinary progress made in the relatively short time since the end of slavery.

The fashions and hairstyles, automobiles and horses, and even such details as a man manually pumping gasoline at a filling station make the films a fascinating record of the lives of Americans, and African Americans in particular, in the early 20th century.

I’ll Be Shopping At Target Now… Black Owned and Proud…

If there is one thing I am not, it is a ‘girly girl’ who enjoys make-up and …all that. I, of course, love eyeliner and mascara, but that isn’t just a look that is a representation of many different things depending on the day/mood…And it is also a tribute to past lives I have not forgotten; as well as a sign of gratitude and a promise to never forget the ancestors who would be so ashamed… We need change;… But I know as we fight forward we also need some positive topics, too, once and again…

And here we are! I think this is so awesome and I had no idea that Target had 1 let alone 22 products that are Black owned! Being a huge supporter of “Buy Black” I will make sure to check it out; and I hope you all will too…

#SOLIDARITY and also, nothing but love and well wishes for those involved ❤

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 “In the last two years I’ve created countless lists featuring black-owned brands from plus size swimwear to skincare, but the response to these listings is always sort of so-so. Folks share the lists, but do they shop? I’m not so sure. Perhaps the reasoning for not Buying Black is due to accessibility. Most online based-businesses have a final sale policy, which can dissuade potential customers. Thankfully, Target is home to 22 Black-owned cosmetics brands, with new ones cropping up all the time. That’s right, now we have the option of buying Black right at our neighborhood Target stores, giving shoppers the option of easily returning products that may not work for them.

Check out this list of 22 Black-owned Beauty Brands sold at Target: ”

Click here for more information and a detailed list, and get to shopping! 🙂

White People: You’re Not a Victim of Racism

There are too many white people who think they are the victims, that try to make the Black community out to be the killers and thugs when in reality, statistics and facts and LIFE show that to not be true. History, shows us this too, with government programs such as the familiar Cointelpro. I’ve studied this for 14 years, and am going to organize some research to post shortly proving these racist morons wrong. It won’t change them. But at least I know I’m doing right. Stop abusing the sickening ‘white privilege’ you have and fight to ensure all people have privilege before going around harming other lives by far that are no where near less than yours.

SPREAD KNOWLEDGE; KILL LIES!

Black Lives Matter – Newark!

Newark, NJ, is a second home to me (after Brooklyn!) and I hope as many as possible in the Newark area show up to and keeping working to end this plague of violence… And it’s time Black and Latino’s stop the hate…. Unify! 💖

Video: Reading a Short and Relevant Essay by Tupac Shakur, 1992

Looking through some of Tupac’s writings I found this short essay he wrote…sadly I believe it to still be relevant today so I decided I’d read and share…

VIDEO: My Police Brutality Channel

Yes, I look like crap; yes, I’ve been crying. How can any one not? It takes a lot to make me cry, but thinking back on all the racism and cases of police killings and beatings, including children, got me. Video below, more to come later today.

David Felix; Remember That Name…

April 25, 2015, the 24 year-old unarmed ‘Black’ man from Haiti; an activist and an aspiring fashion student living in NYC, was murdered by two veteran NYPD ‘detectives.’ It’s sickly ironic to me that they always seem to hit the good guys, maybe I’m just being paranoid; but anyone who is pro-community seems to be an even larger target. Is that just me?David Felix Murdered by NYPD
David was a very popular and welcomed face among the homeless and the runaway youth community here in New York City. Social and legal providers alike knew David Felix to be a man with a beautiful heart; the loving, giving first generation immigrant was welcomed into New York City with open arms because of his good nature, his pure spirit and beautiful heart.
He had a passion of caring for those who needed it the most; hurting a soul was the last thing I can imagine David Felix would have ever thought of. He is the kind of man this world needs more of; not just man, but soul. But the NYPD do not want to see that; especially from a Black male so you know what tragically happens next.

Interviews: Street Artist Aaron Maybin and the Movement for Black Lives Conference

Progressive Graffiti

Bill Fletcher Jr. interviews street artist and activist Aaron Maybin, a former professional football player. Then Fletcher talks with activists about the Movement for Black Lives conference recently held in Cleveland.

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