Category Archives: Protect The Black Community

URGENT! PLEASE SHARE! ANOTHER Missing Black Female; a 15 Year Old Girl, D.C. Area; Urgent!

SOMETHING IS NOT RIGHT!!! URGENT!! Heartbreaking; urgent!! What is happening to all these young Black women and girls?? Why does no one seem to notice or care??? PLEASE SHARE THIS POST! SHE IS 15!!! 

black female missing black children

Critical Aniyah Flythe, 15, who was last seen in the 300 block of Anacostia Road, Southeast, on Friday, April 12, 2019. Seen her? Call 202-727-9099/text 50411

Police are asking for the public’s help in finding a missing 15-year-old girl from the District.

Officer say Aniyah Flythe was last seen in the 300 block of Anacostia Road in Southeast, D.C. on Friday, April 12.

Aniyah is described by police as a black female with a dark complexion, 5-feet-5-inches tall and 160 pounds. She has black hair and brown eyes and was last seen wearing a white shirt, blue jeans and white glittery sneakers.

missing black child amber alert

Video-,Buy Back the Block! Take a Step, Join The Movement if Buying Property and Land; Cheap & Organized

A great, inspiring and easy way to buy back the block! Have ownership in what is rightfully yours, make money and help that money cycle within the community… Let’s thrive!

There is so much history buried I intend to share to anyone who may not be aware of it as soon as my internet is back on (Monday, ideally!)… For now I am limited to posts and I hope you will take the time to consider the videos, and the link to follow.

 Interested? Check out BuyTheBlock’s educational site here & get involved!

Beautiful, Rare Video Footage From the 1920s of All Black Towns

Photo From Video Footage Below

These towns and their self-reliant middle class and affluent residents are documented by the home movies of Reverend S. S. Jones, an itinerant minister and businessman.

Stunning and inspiring! Most of us know about Black Wall Wall Street; but there were many towns across America where Black people thrived. Whites didn’t like that, of course, and as we saw with Black Wall Street, these jealous sick freaks stole by demolishing, because they couldn’t handle not being best. It’s hard to be best when they always had others enslaved doing the work for them. But this is a happy post so!

the video footage by clicking here. I can’t embed it sadly. Article associated posted below.

Part three of a four-part series from the film archive of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture

By the 1920s, Oklahoma was home to some 50 African-American towns, in addition to a large and prosperous black community living in the city of Tulsa. These towns and their self-reliant middle class and affluent residents are documented by the home movies of Reverend S. S. Jones, an itinerant minister and businessman. Known and respected by the citizens of the towns whose lives he captured on film, Rev. Jones’s work offers revealing glimpses of these communities as a haven for African Americans who very often faced discrimination elsewhere in America.

The subjects are everyday life: a family on the front porch of their bungalow, shop workers at a storefront, farmers plowing their fields, children playing on seesaws in a schoolyard. Much of the material documents the economic life of the towns, from business districts filled with prosperous merchants to the homes of successful professionals, with an abundant countryside beyond.

As Rhea Combs, curator of film and photography for the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, points out in her commentary, here we even find a married couple who were oil barons, proof of the extraordinary progress made in the relatively short time since the end of slavery.

The fashions and hairstyles, automobiles and horses, and even such details as a man manually pumping gasoline at a filling station make the films a fascinating record of the lives of Americans, and African Americans in particular, in the early 20th century.

Harvard Making Money Off Slavery Photos; Family Taking it To Court –

“Harvard’s refusal to honor our family’s history by acknowledging our lineage and its own shameful past is an insult to Papa Renty’s life and memory.”- See Below

Though this isn’t the first time white people have made money off of the hard labor and pain endured by Black people. So this isn’t a surprise, no. But I believe it is important to keep up to date on what is being done, and in this instance, I’m interested in how the lawsuit goes. How the courts treat this will tell us a lot.,, perhaps we know already… but each piece of evidence we need to ensure we are aware of.

Every day white people are benefiting from the forced labor Black people gave during enslavement while whites sat back, doing nothing but cruelty, reaping the financial gain which was in fact not rightfully theirs. Black men built this country, but this -and so much more- is insulted, disrespected deeply by the lack of reparations and by the lack of acknowledgement. (Black history month needs to be yearly… and real.)

Reparations are due, that is obvious to the intelligent and moral people. But, that’s another post. (I am still in process of moving but it’s almost over and once it is, I will be posting consistently and often.)

Black people are due at the very least acknowledgment, something Harvard is denying just as much as the rest of America.

Reparations isn’t even a question to anyone who has any morals.

Now, with more money being made off of the detestable history of slavery and adding disrespect by be heaving just as low as they are -and no they aren’t alone- but this case should be watched. Not only the case but the behaviors already shown; making money without a bit of care, the refusal to give credit and the lack of sensitivity and respect is disgustingly showing what we have known.

Being that they are being taken to court is what makes this a case so important to watch because most thievery like this has yet to be taken to court let alone noted in the media. White privilege needs to end.

I believe we should use each and every piece of evidence as more fuel to fight evil, to go after justice… Remember, evil cannot last forever. But we also have to acquire unity, end the violence and put true knowledge in the mind… We can remove evil…

Article follows.

In 1850, a Swiss-born Harvard University professor commissioned what are believed to be the earliest photos of American slaves. 

The images, known as daguerreotypes and taken in a South Carolina studio, are crude and dehumanizing – and they were used to promote racist beliefs.

Among the photographed: an African man named Renty and his daughter, Delia. They were stripped naked and photographed from several angles. Former professor Louis Agassiz, a biologist, had the photos taken to support an erroneous theory called polygenism that he and others used to argue that African-Americans were inferior to white people.

Now, a woman who says she is a direct descendant of that father and child – Tamara Lanier, the great-great-great granddaughter of Renty – is suing Harvard over the photos.

She has accused Harvard of the wrongful seizure, possession and monetization of the images, ignoring her requests to “stop licensing the pictures for the university’s profit” and misrepresenting the ancestor she calls “Papa Renty.”

The university still owns the photos. Lanier, who lives in Connecticut and filed the suit against Harvard in Middlesex County Superior Court on Wednesday, is seeking an unspecified amount of damages from Harvard. She’s also demanding that the university give her family the photos.

In an interview with USA TODAY, Lanier said she has presented Harvard with information about her direct lineage to Renty since around 2011, but the school has repeatedly turned down her requests to review the research.

“This will force them to look at my information,” Lanier said. “It will also force them to publicly have the discussion about who Renty was and restoring him his dignity.”

The suit, which lays out eight different legal claims, cites federal law over property rights, the Massachusetts law for the recovery of personal property and a separate state law about the unauthorized use of a name or picture for advertising purposes.

It also singles out the 13th Amendment to the Constitution, which abolished slavery, arguing that Harvard’s possession of the photos “reflects and is a continuation of core components or incidents of slavery.”

“For years, Papa Renty’s slave owners profited from his suffering. It’s time for Harvard to stop doing the same thing to our family,” Lanier said.

Who was Renty?

Lanier called Renty a “proud man who, like so many enslaved men, women and children endured years of unimaginable horrors.”

“Harvard’s refusal to honor our family’s history by acknowledging our lineage and its own shameful past is an insult to Papa Renty’s life and memory.”

The suit also says Harvard has “never sufficiently repudiated Agassiz and his work.”

Jonathan Swain, a spokesman for Harvard, said Wednesday that the university “has not yet been served, and with that is in no position to comment on this lawsuit filing.”

Lanier is represented by the law firms of national civil rights attorney Benjamin Crump of Florida, who has worked high-profile cases for the families of Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown, as well as Connecticut-based attorney Michael Koskoff.

The photos taken in 1850 of Renty, Delia and 11 other slaves disappeared for more than a century but were rediscovered in 1976 in the attic of Harvard University’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. 

One of the photos of Renty, showing him waist-up as he looks defiantly into the camera, has four decades later turned into an iconic image of slavery in the U.S.  

The lawsuit argues that Harvard has used the Renty images to “enrich itself.” The image is on the the cover of a 2017 book, “From Site to Sight: Anthropology, Photography and the Power of Imagery,” published by the Peabody Museum and sold online by Harvard for $40.

The photo also was displayed on the program for a 2017 conference that Harvard’s Radcliffe Institute for Advance Study hosted on the school’s relationship with slavery. 

According to Lanier’s attorneys, Harvard requires that people sign a contract in order to view the photos and pay a licensing fee to the university to reproduce the images.

“These images were taken under duress, and Harvard has no right to keep them, let alone profit from them,” Koskoff said. “They are the rightful property of the descendants of Papa Renty.”

He accused Harvard of not wanting to tell the “full story” of how Renty’s image was seized – against the will of slaves for a professor who sought to “prove the inferiority” of the black race.

“Harvard continues to this day to honor him, and that’s an abomination,” Koskoff said.

In recent years, Harvard leaders have publicly acknowledged the school’s role in fostering slavery. In addition to the 2017 conference on slavery, the school convened a faculty committee a year earlier to jump-start scholarship and research on Harvard’s history with slavery. 

Former University President Drew Faust said in a speech in 2016 that Harvard was “directly complicit” in America’s system of racial bondage until slavery was abolished in Massachusetts in 1783. She said Harvard remained “indirectly involved through extensive financial and other ties” to slavery in the South. 

“This is our history and our legacy, one we must fully acknowledge and understand in order to truly move beyond the painful injustices at its core,” Faust said.

How the lawsuit began

The suit charts how Lanier, a former chief probation officer in Norwich, Connecticut, has on multiple occasion sought to engage the university about the photos to no avail.

Her attorneys say her effort began in 2011 when she wrote a letter to then-president Faust, whose “evasive response” did not provide an opportunity to discuss returning the photos to Lanier’s family.

Five years later, she says, she reached out to the student-run Harvard Crimson newspaper, but its editor relayed that the story had been “killed” because of concerns from the Peabody Museum. 

In the university’s use of the images, the lawsuit says, Harvard has “avoided the fact that the daguerreotypes were part of a study, overseen by a Harvard professor, to demonstrate racial inferiority of blacks.”

“When will they not condone slavery and finally free Renty? Because their actions denote something different than what they might say,” Crump said.

“We are trying to tell as many people throughout America, and especially black people, that Renty does deserve the right to have his image. He was 169 years a slave, but based on this lawsuit, we sought to make sure he would be a slave no more.”

Agassiz was considered one of the greatest biologists and geologists in the world in the mid-19th century. But his record has become problematic over time. He was an opponent of Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution. And in fiercely subscribing to polygenism, he held the now-debunked belief that white people and African-Americans came from different species. 

The photos he commissioned were taken by J.T. Zealy in a studio in Columbia, South Carolina. He published them a month later in an article titled “The Diversity of Origin of the Human Races.”

Agassiz’s legacy still lives on at Harvard. He founded the school’s Museum of Comparative Zoology, and his wife, Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, also a Harvard researcher of natural history, was founder and the first president of Radcliffe College, now the Society for the Collegiate Instruction of Women. A street in Cambridge is named after Agassiz, and so is a Harvard theater, the Agassiz House.

Lanier has spent recent years researching and talking to genealogical experts who she said have validated her ancestry.

Lanier said she began studying her family’s ancestry after her mother died in 2010 to follow up on family stories she heard about Papa Renty. She worked with Boston genealogist Chris Child, who is known for tracing ancestors of Barack Obama, according to a 2018 article in the Norwich Bulletin.

“It was a journey,” she said. “It was important to my mother that I write this story of who Papa Renty was down and to do a family tree.

“I made a promise to my mother,” she added. 

According to the newspaper, Lanier said she can trace her great-grandfather, named Renty Taylor and then Renty Thompson, to a plantation near Columbia, South Carolina, owned by Benjamin Franklin Taylor. This is where the photos are believed to have been taken.

She said she started providing Harvard evidence that she’s a descendant of Renty but that the school has been “non-responsive.” “Most importantly, I want the true story of who Renty is to be told. That’s all I’ve ever asked for.”

The Bulletin quoted Pamela Gerardi, the Peabody Museum’s director of external relations, who described the photos last year as “extremely delicate” and well cared for.

“We anticipate they will remain here in perpetuity,” she said at the time. “That’s what museums do.”

Link click here.

Black History Month-Brief History & My Stance

“If a race has no history, it has no worthwhile tradition, it becomes a negligible factor in the thought of the world, and it stands in danger of being exterminated. ”

This post was a lot more in-depth than this, but after having it somehow 50% deleted, I figured I would repost the overall main point, and rant on other related issues on another post.

There are a few reasons I truly dislike Black History month. Until recently I had no idea how it was even founded, I’m ashamed to say.

Black men and women more than earned their place in American history books, both before 1776 and definitely after.

Black History happened in crucial ways, daily, and still they received no pay, no acknowledgement, no kindness or humane treatment. Fast forwarding to 2019 where we still are impacted by the actions of these men and women; one example being the White House and all of the surrounding district was built off of the backs -and brains- of Black men. (Info on this to be in an upcoming post)

Despite the impact and astonishing sacrifice, cruelties and inhumanity these people endured; despite what they did to build the structure desired by whites “in government”- there still has been not only no pay, but also no acknowledgement in public schools or by many others I can think of whom “teach history.”

(And yes, money payment is due. White people today; ok so you were not one of the enslavers… you are, however, reaping the benefits of an oppressive system merciful and preferring of whites; OPENLY, heartlessly. While, at the same time, trying to ensure your so called “place as victim” or playing the “denial card” … whatever way a white person goes if it is not in truth you are openly, knowingly allowing lies to be told, truth and history to be surprised and letting a community continue to struggle and suffer due to racism which is indeed very much, too much, alive in America. But I digress.)

And I haven’t even began on the ancient histories not often spoke of except in falsehood.

Such as, the history of truth which when we find in the amazing, breath taking ancient civilizations of Kemet/Egypt / African history. These people are the reason for everything we take for granted today from the 365 calendar to math and medicine and more. (More posts are to come soon on many, many things in respect to this as well!)

On to the point of this post, even though my last writing was far more informative I feel, I best get back on topic.

Though Black History month is not something I support, as noted I support an all year, truthful history, it began of noble means and the history is honorable.

I am ashamed to admit this is a piece of history I only recently learned.

The origins of what was a brave and wonderful proposal, especially in 1926, was created by Mr. Carter G. Woodson, along side the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History.

It was, at that time known as “Negro History Week” and was to be honored every year during the second week of February.

These weeks were not selected at random, instead planned as to include the birthdays of Frederick Douglass in the 14th as well as Abraham Lincoln on the 12th.

It was, of course, not met with much more than a rather lethargic response but it didn’t leave Carter disheartened; quiet the opposite.

It took relentless work and perseverance but it finally began to catch on, and finally, the ambition, and the hopes to share and honor Black History seemed to have succeeded.

It wasn’t until 1976 that American presidents began giving recognition to the cause, but after they acknowledged it as an issue of importance (no matter what the reason they really did it for) it became Black History month.

And so it was. Call me negative if desired but I am a realist; Black History month should not only be a year long study, additionally it should not be limited, as it is now, to slavery, segregation, the civil war, the Civil Rights Movement, riots, sit ins, and/or Dr. King.

Black History does not begin with slavery. With that in mind I hope you will go and do some real research on the truths being hidden from you…. or revisit this page at random to learn more truths they try so hard to hide, or even deny. Despite the proof & evidence to be shared…

Part 2- Video / Thoughts on Previous Documentary & CULTURE…

That is what we are missing; culture! Pride !

The other day I made a video regarding a documentary I was watching. The documentary was about racism and segregation in America; as well we the punishment placed upon the Black community when the government(s) finally “desegregated” –

Teachers, who had been more than such prior but also almost like mothers to their students, were ripped of their jobs. Cultural values and teachings began to fade for Black students as they were plunged in head first to history lessons that involved only white heroes, where the people who built this country with -no payment but a lot; far too much; suffering- never went paid for or acknowledged.

The passion the women in this video had for going to school is astonishing to me. Now a days you can’t get kids to go to school or value education even if you try with all you have. The connection is clear, but I want to explore it more.

But before that; here is last nights video. I hope you are all well!

Newark (NJ) International Film Festival Starts September 6th, 2018!

Positive news from Newark, NJ… If you live in my former city or are close enough to it, make sure to check this out… Here’s a little info from the site which you can read and view in full by clicking the link at the end of the post… Or you can reserve a spot by clicking here. This kind of positivity is NEEDED; especially now… So please share… Thank you! 🙂


NewarkIFF Mission
As the birthplace of celluloid film, Newark, NJ seeks to revolutionize the creation, immersion, submission and viewing process of filmmaking with the commemoration of the Newark International Film Festival. With a groundbreaking 365 strategic approach, we will empower diverse voices, create a unique space for emerging talent through fellowships and developmental mentoring and revolutionize the industry for generations to come.

Introducing the Newark International Film Festival
The 3-day festival will showcase the breadth of the film industry including screenings at a number of cultural anchor institutions and outdoor screenings (weather permitting), stunt exhibitions, pitch opportunities and auditions for TV and film, acting, directing, producing and crowd funding workshops, and much more. The NIFF is the first international film festival hosted in Newark. A main feature of the NIFF will be the Hannibal Goodwin Award for Innovation in Filmmaking in homage to Hannibal Goodwin, the Episcopal priest who invented celluloid film 1887 in Newark, NJ.

The Newark International Film Festival (NIFF) is dedicated to the art of storytelling through film. The NIFF puts filmmakers in front of major players in the film industry and movie lovers from around the world. NIFF’s audience is important, affluent, and eager to celebrate.

Find out more about the events and guests and more by clicking here.