Category Archives: Border Patrol & Abuse

Newark, NJ, ICE LockUp’s Exposed: Once Again! ANOTHER CRITICAL WATCHDOG REPORT: ROTTEN FOOD, DECAYING MATTRESSES

Why in hell do we have people in any positions of power who are abusing, in any shape or form, fellow humans, sexually harassing them, making them sleep in decaying beds…and then sarcastically playing it off as if it isn’t an issue… HOW DO THEY SLEEP AT NIGHT!?

And how do those of you who turn the other way live with your selfish souls?

This is more than I humane… and if you are one of these jerks who can’t even stand against what’s wrong but complain about those who DO speak out; it is you that is the fool and should be ashamed. I sure as hell am not and by being silent you only aid cruelty.

What is more, someone came talking to someone near me about a woman complaining about her food quality. He played some YouTube video they’d made into a joke of her, I didn’t fully understand what in hell they were on about…

Now I do. If I’d been more up to date then I’d have torn into their sick souls for truth and knowledge I will always inflict; I don’t care when or who you are… please share!

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A Newark, New Jersey immigrant detention center has been feeding detainees moldy, spoiled and foul-smelling food—an abuse that’s led detainees to file scores of grievances and to report symptoms of food poisoning, according to a report released Friday by the Department of Homeland Security’s Inspector General.

The center, which can house more than 900 men, is run by the Essex County Department of Corrections, under an agreement with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE. DHS inspectors conducted a surprise visit last July and found multiple health-and-safety violations of detainee rights and ICE standards. The inspector general’s report noted that the Essex County Correctional Facility also failed to disclose to ICE, as required, incidents involving fights among detainees and hospitalization of detainees for mental illness.

A detainee also found a loaded gun belonging to a guard in a bathroom, the inspector general’s report said.  Center staff admitted to inspectors that they told the detainee who found the gun “not to discuss the matter with anyone,” according to inspectors.

In the report, inspectors noted that detainees filed about 200 grievances about food quality during the first six months of 2018.

“For dinner, we were served meatballs that smelled like fecal matter,” one detainee wrote.

“The food that we received has been complete garbage,” another wrote. He also wrote: “I have a stomach infection because of it and the nurse herself told me it was caused by the food.”

Inspectors observed “expired and moldy bread” in a refrigerator, despite requirements that staff toss it out.  “The food handling in general was so substandard that ICE and facility leadership had the kitchen manager replaced during our inspection,” inspectors reported.

ICE asserted that after seeing a draft of the report its officials immediately initiated a follow-up review process” at the Essex facility. ICE and Essex detention officials could not be reached for comment.

ButWNYC radio in New York reported that ICE, in a statement,

said that conditions inside Essex had improved and that ICE was “committed to continually enhancing” detention operations to promote “a safe and secure environment.”

The inspector general additionally detailed how inspectors last July found showers at Essex covered with mold. Staff had placed trash cans under holes in ceilings to collect rain leaking in; two leaks were in detainee rooms right over their beds.

When inspectors asked guards about decaying mattresses they observed, the report says,

guards said they “wait for detainees to complain” before staff put in a request that mattresses be replaced.  😡😡

The Newark immigration detention center isn’t the first facility where DHS inspectors have found neglect and substandard conditions.

In October, a DHS inspector general report found violations at the Adelanto detention center in California that included inappropriate handcuffing and shackling of detainees and medical neglect, as theCenter for Public Integrity reported.

A dentist employed at Adelanto, which is operated by the private GEO Group, Inc., told inspectors that detainees could use strings from their socks to floss their teeth if dental floss was not available to them.

Inspectors also found evidence that a disabled detainee in a wheelchair was placed into “segregation,” or isolation, for nine days, during which time he was unable to sleep in a bed or brush his teeth.

In January, another DHS inspector general reportaccused ICE of issuing only two penalties against contractors holding immigrant detainees despite finding 14,000 violations of detainee rights and ICE standards. The violations were found at 106 contract detention centers from 2015 to 2018. Violations included contractors’ failure to report alleged sexual assaults to ICE. Last September, the Center reported on private-prison companies’ history, and allegations of abuses that include medical neglect.

Can and How Will Immigrants Get Justice in Abuses Endured By Border Patrol?

Though this devastating reality is a reality for far too many immigrants, sometimes being reminded via things such as the following help keep those not impacted by it reminded that it is not a topic that has gone away and is in need of our attention now more than ever. As obvious as this may be, it is a sad but needed reminder for too many… Please take the time to read and share… Link to original post and more info is in link at bottom.

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HOUSTON — Within hours of being booked at a Border Patrol station in far West Texas, two teenage sisters from Guatemala came forward to allege that an agent conducted an improper strip search.

The agent in question denied the allegations, including the sisters’ claims that he touched their genitals. He insisted he had only fingerprinted the sisters before taking them back to their cell.

Investigating the case came down to the sisters’ word versus the agent’s. And as in dozens of similar cases, government investigators sided with the agent.

Advocates say the case — outlined in a report compiled by internal investigators — shows the kinds of hurdles detained immigrants face when they make claims of misconduct, even when they come forward immediately, as the sisters did.

“These women were actually, for lack of a better word, lucky that their case was investigated,” said Christina Mansfield, co-founder of the advocacy group Freedom for Immigrants. “They are in the extreme minority in that regard.”

The sisters, ages 17 and 19, entered the U.S. without legal permission in July 2016, several days after leaving their home village in Guatemala. They were detained by Border Patrol agents shortly after crossing the border.

The Associated Press received a redacted copy of the investigative report through the Freedom of Information Act. It shows that investigators determined that the sisters’ allegations could not be substantiated due to a lack of physical evidence.

The station where the sisters were detained did not have cameras in the booking area. The room where the sisters say they were taken, later described as a supply room or a closet, wasn’t processed for fingerprints because the sisters said they didn’t touch anything. And the agent in question said he was alone with the sisters due to manpower shortages, the report says.

Immigration advocates say the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Inspector General, which reviewed the sisters’ case, rarely recommends action against officers. A study by Freedom for Immigrants found that between January 2010 and July 2016, the inspector general received 84 complaints of coerced sexual contact against U.S. Customs and Border Protection, which includes Border Patrol. The inspector general opened just seven investigations, none of which are known to have led to charges, according to the study, which was conducted by examining government records.

The study found a similarly low number of cases were investigated by the inspector general for detention facilities operated by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

CBP would not directly address the sisters’ case or whether it disciplined the agent involved. The agency said it was committed to treating detainees with “professionalism and courtesy.”

Immigration authorities detain and process thousands of people every month who cross the U.S. border without permission. Border Patrol chief Carla Provost said in a recent interview that her agency takes any allegations against any of its 19,000 agents “very, very seriously.” Provost previously led CBP’s internal affairs division, which also investigates allegations of employee wrongdoing and that the agency has taken steps to strengthen in recent years.

“They are very few and far between,” she said, speaking generally about misconduct complaints.

The sisters were taken by agents to the Presidio Border Patrol station and booked into the same holding cell. The agents who detained them went out on another call.

According to the report, a third agent then took the elder sister out of the cell. He told investigators that he processed and fingerprinted each of them before returning them to their cell.

The elder sister told a different story. She said the agent took her into a back room that had a table filled with snacks and drinks. There, she says, the agent told her to lift her sweater and dress. The woman said that after a small photograph fell out of her bra, the agent pulled up her bra. Then, she said, he told her to remove her pants and underwear, then touched her genitals with the outer part of his hand.

The younger sister would accuse the agent of conducting a similar search.

Border Patrol guidelines prohibit male agents to strip-search female detainees “except in exigent circumstances,” and only then with another agent present to observe. Under the guidelines, a vaginal cavity search must be done by a medical professional at a medical facility.

When the agent later heard one of the sisters accusing him of misconduct, the report says, he “became upset and told the girl he didn’t make her do that.”

According to the investigators’ report, one agent said that “this is exactly the reason cameras are needed in the processing area.”

The accused agent would speak to investigators three times. The last time, an investigator noted the agent “appeared to be nervous and removed,” and he “had to constantly review a prepared statement” from his initial interview. But a month after the last interview, investigators took their case to a federal prosecutor, James Miller, who agreed with their conclusion that there was a “lack of evidence.”

Miller declined to comment on why he didn’t pursue a prosecution. The agent did not return phone messages from The Associated Press, nor did his attorney, Raymond Martinez.

The sisters were eventually released and went to live with their mother in California. One of the sisters has since sued the U.S. government. Court filings show both sides are now discussing a settlement.

Lauer reported from Philadelphia. Associated Press writer Colleen Long in Washington contributed to this report.