Thank You Unknown Heroes… & If You Need Help in Floods From Hurricane Harvey? Read This & PLEASE SHARE!

It’s sad that it takes such tragedy and neglect from those in so called power to reveal whom the true heroes are…and it sure as hell isn’t the government or cops, if you ask me.It’s everyday people… Like this man. IF YOU NEED HELP NOW PLEASE CONTACT THIS MAN; HE WILL HELP YOU… PLEASE RT! AND THANK HIM… WE NEED MORE MEN LIKE HIM. And in case he somehow sees it… You’re a hero… I admire you so much; thank you…. Ankh, Udja, Seneb….

Bless him and keep him safe….

I don’t know why these people aren’t the center of national news… Well… Sadly, I guess we do know. IT’S TIME TO CHANGE THAT BS!

If you want another example of a hero helping others? This time it’s a female… Check her out, and never say there’s nothing you can do…

First she saved people from the KKK… Now, she’s been going out in these waters, saving people…. Check out her story….

keshia thomas hurricane harvey

Her paypal is-> Keshiathomasm@gmail.com – I think we should be doing this for the man above, also…

keisha thomas hurricane

More on the above photo, in the screen shot to the left of this text.

(scroll down a bit for more of the info/article)

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Following this is another example of this woman’s amazing care for other humans…. This was 20ish years back… the 1990s… I am old. Anyway!Article of Her Amazing Work Against Sick KKK in 20 years back… Only to reemerge ❀ Blessings… These are the real heroes. Nothing to gain; only doing what is right. #HOPE

Check some more about her selfless and brave actions out… These are the true heroes… THESE people need to be remembered, too! AND THANKED.of Her Amazing Work Against Sick KKK in 20 years back… Only to reemerge ❀ Blessings… These are the real heroes. Nothing to gain; only doing what is right. #HOPE

Below is the story of her brave work for the people Against the Sick KKK 20 years back… And as we see… She’s still doing kind acts… ❀ Blessings…

Neither of these souls had anything to gain. They only act off of being a good, selfless concern for fellow souls/humans… Amazing… Inspired by nothing more than not wanting to sit by and let innocent people be neglected and suffer; and die… Going out and risking their lives only to help others and because it is doing what is right. #HOPE

By Martin Slagter

mslagter@mlive.com

HOUSTON – Some moments have a way of defining us, Keshia Thomas said, whether we’re ready for them or not.

Thomas’ moment came under unexpected circumstances – crouched over a white supremacist sympathizer, providing a human shield from anti-Ku Klux Klan protesters who began attacking him at a rally 20 years ago.

The image of Thomas, then an 18-year-old black teenager living in Ann Arbor, protecting the man decked in a confederate flag shirt and sporting an SS tattoo, has become an iconic symbol of peace and altruistic virtue for many over the past two decades.
Former Ann Arbor resident Keshia Thomas has continued her pursuit of human rights as an activist in the 20 years since she shielded KKK sympathizer Albert McKeel Jr. from being beaten by protesters at an event in Ann Arbor. Photo provided/Keshia Thomas
Former Ann Arbor resident Keshia Thomas has continued her pursuit of human rights as an activist in the 20 years since she shielded KKK sympathizer Albert McKeel Jr. from being beaten by protesters at an event in Ann Arbor. Photo provided/Keshia Thomas (Photo provided/Keshia Thomas)

Showing up to voice her opposition to the KKK rally, Thomas has since described her actions as “two angels picking my body up and laying me down,” in a moment requiring split-second judgment.

In that moment, Thomas said, everything had changed.

“We all have a conscience and it was my responsibility to do what I felt was right,” Thomas said in a phone interview on June 23, the day after the 20-year anniversary of the incident.

She’s told and retold the story many times of how she saved the man from being beaten with protesting placards outside the KKK rally in Ann Arbor in 1996. Twenty years later, she wants her countless supporters to know the results of that act of courage.

Protecting the man, Albert McKeel Jr., set into motion a relationship with his son, who later thanked Thomas for her bravery after encountering her in a coffee shop.

Thomas, who now resides in Houston, learned McKeel Jr. died a couple of months ago when McKeel’s son called to inform her, putting his 12-year-old sister on the line to tell her she might not be alive if it hadn’t been for Thomas’ actions that day.

“When I heard that, I thought this was the future and the past of what peace has created,” Thomas said. “The real accomplishment of all this to me is to know that his son and daughter don’t share the same views. History didn’t repeat itself. That’s what gives me hope that the world can get better from generation to generation.”
Keshia Thomas shields Albert McKeel Jr. from being attacked by anti-KKK demonstrators during a protest of the KKK’s appearance in Ann Arbor on June 22, 1996. Thomas, who now lives in Houston, has gone on to be a keynote speaker and activist for human rights. The images of her protecting McKeel have been seen around the world, being named one of Life Magazine’s best photos of 1996. Photo provided/Mark Brunner
Keshia Thomas shields Albert McKeel Jr. from being attacked by anti-KKK demonstrators during a protest of the KKK’s appearance in Ann Arbor on June 22, 1996. Thomas, who now lives in Houston, has gone on to be a keynote speaker and activist for human rights. The images of her protecting McKeel have been seen around the world, being named one of Life Magazine’s best photos of 1996. Photo provided/Mark Brunner (Mark Brunner)

Thomas remembers appearing in opposition to the KKK group in an effort organized by the National Women’s Rights Organizing Coalition outside Ann Arbor’s city hall on June 22, 1996. At one point, a woman with a megaphone shouted, “There’s a Klansman in the crowd!”

Thomas, who was still in high school, turned and saw McKeel Jr., taking off away from the crowd. It wasn’t long before mob mentality took over and the crowd had McKeel on the ground.

Thomas, horrified to see the man being kicked and beaten, threw herself on top of McKeel to shield him from the blows.

The story has been revisited many times in years since by publications like the BBC News Magazine, People Magazine, the Huffington Post and New York Daily News, while the image of her protecting McKeel was named one of Life Magazine’s best photos of 1996. She even shared her story on “Oprah.”
Keshia Thomas shields Albert McKeel Jr. from being attacked by anti-KKK demonstrators during a protest of the KKK’s appearance in Ann Arbor on June 22, 1996. Thomas, who now lives in Houston, has gone on to be a keynote speaker and activist for human rights. The images of her protecting McKeel have been seen around the world, being named one of Life Magazine’s best photos of 1996. Photo provided/Mark Brunner
Keshia Thomas shields Albert McKeel Jr. from being attacked by anti-KKK demonstrators during a protest of the KKK’s appearance in Ann Arbor on June 22, 1996. Thomas, who now lives in Houston, has gone on to be a keynote speaker and activist for human rights. The images of her protecting McKeel have been seen around the world, being named one of Life Magazine’s best photos of 1996. Photo provided/Mark Brunner (Mark Brunner)

All the while, Thomas has continue to pursue activism for equal rights, spreading the same message she stood for 20 years ago.

Since the incident in Ann Arbor, Thomas has volunteered in New York in the wake of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, organized a shelter to help fires victims in California, distributed food for victims of Hurricane Katrina, walked 1,000 miles from Selma, Alabama, to Washington D.C., with the NAACP for voting rights and volunteered at a makeshift hospital in Haiti.

For 20 years, Thomas said, she has been trying to live up to her actions in Ann Arbor.

“I think of my actions the same way I felt about them 20 years ago,” she said. “You don’t want to grow older and be bitter and more cynical. You want to keep those child-like ideals of innocence and justice. I still maintain those same views and I’m not jaded by the way things are now.”

Thomas said she is proud that her spur-of-the-moment decision to show compassion has endured 20 years later.

Her actions have reached a new generation, recently going viral after appearing on the “A Mighty Girl” Facebook group – shared 44,000 times within the period of a couple of days following the 20th anniversary of her act.

“I think it has inspired people. I do get letters, emails and messages from all over the world,” she said. “I think it will continue to inspire people long after I’m gone.

“The incident wasn’t about me,” she added. “I just happened to be a vessel that carried this message. This story is about humanity.”

In addition to her connection to McKeel’s family, Thomas remains in contact with others who were changed by the incident.

Mark Brunner, who was documenting the protest as a photography student at Lansing Community College, has maintained a friendship with Thomas after snapping some of the shots that have since been seen across the globe.

Thomas’ courage that day still stands out to Brunner, who began tracking McKeel after spotting him wearing a Confederate flag shirt.

“I still look back at those images and wonder how things would have turned out for that man and the rest of us if she hadn’t stepped in,” he said in an email. “What image would I have photographed then? Thanks to Keshia I’ll never know.”
Keshia Thomas shields Albert McKeel Jr. from being attacked by anti-KKK demonstrators during a protest of the KKK’s appearance in Ann Arbor on June 22, 1996. Thomas, who now lives in Houston, has gone on to be a keynote speaker and activist for human rights. The images of her protecting McKeel have been seen around the world, being named one of Life Magazine’s best photos of 1996. Photo provided/Mark Brunner
Keshia Thomas shields Albert McKeel Jr. from being attacked by anti-KKK demonstrators during a protest of the KKK’s appearance in Ann Arbor on June 22, 1996. Thomas, who now lives in Houston, has gone on to be a keynote speaker and activist for human rights. The images of her protecting McKeel have been seen around the world, being named one of Life Magazine’s best photos of 1996. Photo provided/Mark Brunner (Mark Brunner)

Thomas hopes to eventually return to Michigan. She has long been pursuing plans to start an organization, Point (standing for Purpose, Opportunity, Independence, New, Thinking) that will serve as a business incubator in Detroit, giving those in need opportunities and resources to fulfill their dreams and become self-sufficient.

In the meantime, she continues to spread her message of equal rights as a keynote speaker in lectures at corporate events, universities, grade schools and synagogues across the country.

You might say it has all come as a result of her actions on June 22, 1996. Thomas would be OK with that.

“I feel like if I was taken out of this world tomorrow and forced to ask myself if I led a life of purpose, I could look back and say ‘absolutely,'” she said.